Snake River students honor the flag at vets' assembly

Snake River High School coach and teacher Neil Hillman was the keynote speaker during the veterans' assembly at the high school on Wednesday. Snake River HIgh School Assistant Principal Rich Dunn (in middle) introduced the Snake River graduates who are serving in the military on Wednesday at the high school veterans' assembly. This howitzer and its flag greeted Snake River High School students as they entered the high school for the veterans' assembly. The howitzer slowly moved down the highway on Wednesday.
By: 
LESLIE MIELKE
Staff Writer

The American flag, its history and the national anthem were the centerpiece at the veterans' assembly at the Snake River High School Wednesday morning. After the flag was brought in by members of the National Guard, the combined band, choirs and orchestra performed "God Bless America Again."
Frances Scott Key, author of "The Star-Spangled Banner," wrote his poem in 1815 after watching the British bombard Fort McHenry during the War of 1812. The British admiral had told Key the bombardment would stop if the Americans would lower their flag. As Key shouted information about the progress of the battle down to the American prisoners housed in the bowels of the ship, he was asked: "Is the flag still flying?"
"By the dawn's early light," Key saw the flag still flying over the rampart of Fort McHenry. It was set at an odd angle. Key later discovered the flag was held upright by the men in the Fort who died making sure the flag remained aloft.
As President George Washington stated: "The thing that separates the American Christian from every other person on earth is the fact that he would rather die on his feet, than live on his knees!"
As the National Anthem was sung, led by veterans, the entire student body rose to its feet.
To read the entire, see it in the Friday, Nov. 10, edition of the Morning News.

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